Meet The Rangers

 

The Mara Elephant Project’s local Maasai rangers have been a crucial part of the organization since the start and work tirelessly to protect elephants to conserve the greater Mara ecosystem, one of Kenya’s most important ecosystems. MEP’s rangers are at the forefront of our anti-poaching operations and human-elephant conflict mitigation efforts through boots on the ground initiatives, living out in the field for up to two-months at a time.

Their responsibilities include: monitoring collared elephants; anti-poaching patrols; poacher arrests; collecting intelligence; removing bushmeat snares; rapid-response and resolution of human-elephant conflict; and communicating with communities. MEP’s relationship with the local people in the Maasai Mara is key to successfully saving elephant lives thus keeping the ecosystem thriving. Being a MEP ranger means that you must, at all times, endeavor to maintain good relations with the public.

“THE BACKBONE OF THE MARA ELEPHANT PROJECT ARE THE RANGERS. THEY’RE FROM THIS AREA. THEY’RE AMBASSADORS IN THE COMMUNITY. THEY ARE TAKING OWNERSHIP OF BEING ABLE TO RESPOND EFFECTIVELY.”  Marc Goss, CEO, Mara Elephant Project

In that last seven years (2011-2018), MEP has trained, deployed and managed a total of 57 rangers in partnership with the Kenya Wildlife Service.

Rangers on patrol

MEP believes in investing in our rangers; they are ambassadors for conservation. All MEP rangers have undergone extensive tactical and basic medical training provided by 51 Degrees Limited. We provide competitive remuneration, equip them appropriately and deliver on incentives.

In 2019, MEP introduced the ranger school fees program, where each MEP ranger can apply for school fees to be provided in full for up to two of their children at any grade level. MEP feels it’s vitally important to recognize the central part the rangers play in our conservation operations.